Articles

  1. Grandpas Feeders

    When I first built our coop I wanted a near maintenance free feeder that I could fill and not have to worry about refilling for several days. I built a do-it-yourself PVC gravity feeder and at first it worked well. You could fill outside the coop; gravity would feed the tray and keep refilling the tray until the top tube was exhausted of feed. The system was free of exposure to the elements with a capped top and the feed tray underneath the coop roof. Even with not being exposed to the...
  2. Incubating Chicken Eggs

    Obtaining Hatching Eggs Fertile eggs can usually be obtained from hatcheries, poultry breeders, E-bay, Craigslist, and other sources. You can look online or in the yellow pages of your phone directory for names of hatcheries and poultry breeders. If possible pick up fertile eggs instead of having them shipped. Many things can go wrong when eggs are shipped, such as x-rays, rough handling, over heating or under heating, etc. All these factors can play a roll in whether a fertile egg will...
  3. Brooding Chicks

    Brooding Chicks Whether you order chicks from a hatchery, purchase from a breeder, or incubate yourself , you need to have a home for your new chicks to keep them safe , warm, and fed. In this handout you will learn the basic brooding requirements and procedures to keep your new chicks healthy. The Brooder People brood their new chicks in all kinds of containers. Old rabbit cages, altered tote bins, and purchased specialized brooders are just some of those ways. When brooding chicks, you...
  4. Cheery Chicks Chicken Kooler Review

    I love chickens. Having raised chickens most of my life I find a natural affinity to them, but if there's one thing I desperately try to get out of, it's cleaning most everything in their coop. Especially the water dishes. Most watering systems are the same. You fill it up at the top and it empties out into a tray, leaving plenty of places for dirt, scat, and everything else to deposit. The clean up process usually takes a thorough rinsing and some hand time on the less than desirable...
  5. The Quick Chick Brooder Fix

    I've used this style of brooder for the past two batches of chicks I've brooded and have found it convenient, cheap, and effective. I used it on one flock of 54 CX broilers in early March of last year and a flock of 28 dual purpose heritage blood Delawares near the end of April of this year. Out of necessity, some chick brooders need more space due to the number or growth patterns of the birds involved and this seems to become an issue of cost and convenience to some. Unless you have a...
  6. How We Introduced Our Backyard Chicks To The Family Dog

    This is our second year having backyard chickens. We live in a city, and can only have four chickens (we have five, but our neighbors don't mind). We also have a dog, a Pembroke Welsh Corgi, named Khaleesi. Corgis are herding dogs and they love to chase, so we were a bit nervous about how having a dog and chickens in the same yard would work out, but it has worked out wonderfully! I'll tell you what worked for us, but our methods might not work for everyone. Your dog may be completely...
  7. What To Expect With Backyard Chickens

    Thinking about getting backyard chickens? I'm sure you have done the research on breeds, care, feeding, and housing. You probably know more about chickens that you ever thought you would. Here are some things that you might not know. Chickens have huge personalities. Each hen is a bit different than her flock mates and while they may have similarities, no two birds are alike. Chickens are entertaining to watch. I chuckle every time I see them run across the yard, with their little heads...
  8. Australorps

    The Australorp was developed in Australia in 1890 by breeding Rhode Island Reds with Orpingtons. There was a lot of controversy created in naming this bird as some suggested it be called Australs and others Australian Utility Orpingtons. Eventually they settled on the name Australorps being short for Australian Orpingtons. They come in both standard size, with the hen weighing an average of 7.3-9.2 lbs and cock 8.6-10.3 lbs, and Bantam weighing 1.7 lbs for hen and 3.7 lbs for cocks. Black is...
  9. Incubator Warehouse Giveaway!

    The fine folks over at Incubator Warehouse have donated three great prizes to be given away here on ChickenForum. Up for grabs is an egg-o-meter for monitoring temperatures in your incubator, and a couple of Incu-Bright Cool Light Egg Candlers to check on those developing eggs! Please follow this link for complete rules of entry and to join. [URL]http://www.chickenforum.com/f10/incubator-warehouse-giveaway-7000/[/URL]
  10. Photo of the Month now Sponsored by CheeryChicks!

    I'm happy to announce that CheeryChicks.com now sponsors our Photo of the Month contest. Each month CheeryChicks will select a prize to be given away from their product line and the selected winner will have it shipped direct to them. That's right guys, free chicken products for snapping some pics. Make sure to join each month for your chance at winning that month's prize! This month they are offering their CK2 waterer for the winner.This 3.5 gallon pail with the standard "EZ Access Lid"...
  11. Raise Your Chickens Organically

    I live up here in the North Georgia Mountains, and there's a Tyson poultry plant just down the road from where I live. I tend to see large Tyson trucks carrying layer upon layer of confined chickens stacked on top of one another. If you happen tobenext to thesetrucks sitting in traffic, then you'll know that the smell can be horrendous. The chickens are crammed in small cages with little room, some not moving at all. No matter what farmers and the chicken industry may say, being crammed in...
  12. Building A Hoop Coop

    Have you ever found your chickens in a place you did not want, or expect, them to be? Have you ever come outside to find eggs in the shoes you left on your front porch or not been able to find any eggs at all? Worse yet, have your chickens fallen victim to that which goes bump in the night, leaving only a pile of feathers and no clue as to what the exact culprit may be? These things happen, but there are measures you can take to prevent them. Until you decide to place your chickens in the...
  13. Chicken Breeds

    Having chickens around can be a rewarding and fun experience, but there are different breeds to consider. Some breeds are better foragers, while others lay eggs more often than most. It all depends on what you plan to do with your chickens when considering different types to get. Nowadays, chickens can be divided into 3 categories: mixed hybrids, pure breeds and egg-laying birds. The hybrid chickens are known for meat consumption. They tend to have a higher body mass for maximum meat...
  14. Backyard Dinosaurs

    Many moons ago, I was introduced to a new resident at the barn where I keep my horses. His name was "Hoppy" and he was a retired fighting rooster, or so the story goes. No one knows what happened to him to bring about his retirement, but he moved with a distinct, hopping gait. He was purchased at a flea market at a discount due to this defect and bore all the physical adaptations of a true fighting cock. He wavered from being strangely tame to downright dangerous as one minute you could pick...
  15. Give Life to An Egg

    Hatching chicks is an easy process, but it is a matter of patience and timing. The primary tool you'll need in breathing life into your eggs is an incubator. Above all, chicks need heat in order grow inside egg, and you'll be providing that for them. Eggs are most ready to hatch within a seven day time frame of being laid. After 10 days, the chance of nurturing them drops even further. The entire hatching process should take 21 days, but some eggs may hatch a few days early. For...
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